What is Placental Tissue Banking?

The placental tissue is a versatile tissue containing a variety of powerful multipotent cells, growth factors, and cytokines. These multipotent stem cells are capable of differentiating into a number of different cell and tissue types. The growth factors found in the placental tissue are signaling molecules that regulate cell growth and tissue regeneration. Cytokines are signaling molecules that regulate inflammation. These placental derived stem cells can be used for a variety of therapeutic applications while the placental membrane can be used for wound and ocular applications - resulting in a tissue that could protect generations of your family.

Detailed diagram showing different parts of the body involved during pregnancy.

What is a Placenta?

The placenta is a disc-shaped organ that develops during pregnancy. It is attached to the wall of the uterus and connects to the baby via the umbilical cord.

 

Its primary role is to provide oxygen and nutrients to the growing baby. The placenta also removes waste products from the baby's blood.

 

The placental membrane consists of amnion and chorion. These act as barriers to bacteria and viruses to protect the baby. It also produces hormones and signaling molecules that help the baby grow.

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View of a placenta from under a microscope.

The Placental Membrane Contains:

The placental membrane consists of amnion and chorion. These act as barriers to bacteria and viruses to protect the baby. As researchers have studied placental membranes in more depth, they have learned that each part of the placental membrane plays a significant role in regenerative medicine. The key elements of placental membranes include: 

 

Amniotic Epithelial Cells (AECs) 

Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells 

Chorion Trophoblast Stem Cells (CTSCs) 

Growth Factors Cytokines 

Extracellular Matrix (ECM)

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The Difference Between Placental Tissue and Cord Tissue Banking

Placental tissue consists of amniotic epithelial cells, amniotic mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and cytokines embedded within the placental membrane (amnion and chorion). Cord tissue consists of mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and cytokines embedded within the cord lining and Wharton’s Jelly. Each of these tissues contain different types of stem cells, growth factors, and cytokines. In addition, cord tissue is much thicker than placental tissue. 

 

These key differences play a significant role in their uses clinically. Cord-derived stem cells have been used in clinical trials researching potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, autism, cerebral palsy, diabetes, and more. The cord tissue membrane has been used in surgical applications including general surgery, orthopedic surgery, and urology. 

 

Placental-derived stem cells have been used in clinical trials researching potential treatments for autoimmune diseases, Graft vs Host disease, gynecological conditions, and more. Placental tissue membranes have been used for clinical applications such as chronic non-healing skin wounds, corneal healing, and knee osteoarthritis. 

 

Together, researchers believe that placental tissue, cord tissue, and cord blood collectively could unlock the full potential of regenerative medicine. Many expecting families choose to preserve all three to ensure the greatest chance of treatment options for their families today, tomorrow, and in the years ahead.

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Americord CryoMaxx™ Placental Tissue Processing

Americord's proprietary CryoMaxx™ processing method uses minimal manipulation to isolate amnion and chorion layers of the placental tissue to keep their inherent multipotent cells, growth factors, and cytokines through cryopreservation.

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Clinical Trials Using Placental Tissue

The placental membrane has been used for more than a century to successfully treat wounds and burns. Today, placental tissue is being studied in a number of clinical trials ranging from treatments for internal sicknesses and diseases, to skin and eye wounds.

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Amnion Membrane

Autism 

Cerebral Palsy 

Liver Cirrhosis 

Pulmonary Inflammation and Infection 

Graft Versus Host Disease

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Blood Disorders

Autoimmune Diseases 

Cancer 

Graft vs. Host Disease 

Gynecological Conditions 

Lung Diseases 

Neurological Disorders 

Orthopedic Conditions

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Amnion + Chorion Membranes

Multiple Sclerosis 

Parkinson’s 

Vascular Dementia 

Eye Conditions

Questions About Placental Tissue

Placental tissue stem cells, derived from the placenta, have gained significant attention in the field of regenerative medicine due to their remarkable versatility and therapeutic potential. They are being studied for use in wound healing, tissue repair, treating eye conditions, and more.

Americord’s unique proprietary CryoMaxx™ processing method uses a minimal manipulation method to isolate the amnion and chorion layers of the placental tissue and retain their inherent multipotent cells, growth factors, and cytokines.

 

The amnion and chorion are cryopreserved and stored in multiple vials, ensuring the potential for multiple uses.

Placental tissue is FDA-approved for surgical use and has done so successfully for over 100 years. Currently, there are no FDA-approved treatments outside of the surgical space. However, there are currently over 50 active and recruiting studies using placental tissue to treat medical conditions.

Cord tissue and placental tissue are both rich sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but they have different application uses. Cord tissue is used for surgical applications inside the body (ex: tendon repair, cartilage repair, or orthopedic surgery). Placenta tissue used for topical applications (ex: wound healing, treating eye conditions, ulcers). Having access to both provides your family with more healing potential in the future.

Your baby's placental tissue holds the potential to benefit both immediate family members, such as parents and siblings, as well as second-degree family members, like grandparents. This means that not only can it provide essential support to your closest loved ones but also offer a valuable resource for relatives beyond your immediate family circle.

Most hospitals in the U.S. dispose of the placenta after birth, as it is considered medical waste. If you plan to bank your placental tissue or transport it home for future use, make those desires known during your prenatal visits and to your delivery care team prior to birth.